Categories / Philosophy

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For many, Einstein’s renown as a scientist has obscured other aspects of his life and thought. The World As I See It is a collection of essays, lectures, and letters Einstein wrote in the 1920s and 30s on topics as diverse as politics, culture, education, and spirituality. These essays shed new light on one of the greatest minds the world has known by showing his deep concern and love for life and humanity.

Read on for key insights from The World as I See It.

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5 Minute Read

In a world that seems fast-paced, we have lost the art of serenity, of being still. We hunt the next high, we chase the next craze, accrue more things, but where does this get us? Paradoxically, for all our chasing, we miss out on so much! In The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down, Sunim offers reflections on life, love, relationships, and spirituality, illuminating aspects of the human condition that we are prone to forget.

Read on for key insights from The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down.

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9 Minute Read

In the popular sci-fi movie, The Matrix, the lead character, Neo, is informed that an artificial intelligence has subjugated the human race. To keep humanity blissfully unaware of its captivity, each person has been plugged into a life-like computer simulation. Upon his learning of this, Neo is given a choice between a blue pill and a red pill. If he takes the blue pill, he'll reenter the simulation none the wiser. If he takes the red pill, he'll escape the delusion and remain in the real world, awake and aware of the truth.

According to evolutionary psychologist Robert Wright, the circumstances and choice that Neo faced are also before us. Marshaling the latest in scientific and psychological research, he argues that science corroborates many central elements of Buddhist thought. Why Buddhism is True is his attempt to show how each of us has a warped understanding of reality and that Buddhist philosophy and meditation form the red pill we would be wise to take.

Read on for key insights from Why Buddhism is True.

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7 Minute Read

Why would God allow suffering? If he is loving, how could he send people to hell? Why does Christianity have to be so exclusive? In The Reason for God, Keller looks at questions and objections he has frequently encountered over the years as a pastor in the heart of New York City. After responding to objections, he makes a case for the Christian faith and the reasons for God. 

Read on for several key insights from The Reason for God. 

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12 Minute Read

In Enlightenment Now, Pinker argues that our twenty-first-century world would benefit greatly from a revitalization of the values of reason, science, humanism and progress. In contrast with the somber tenor of most social commentary, Enlightenment Now is a celebration of human accomplishment and the enlightenment goals for human betterment that will keep progress coming.

Read on for key insights from Enlightenment Now.

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8 Minute Read

In the face of unspeakable cruelty and crushing conditions in Nazi concentration camps, Viktor Frankl learned that it is still possible to live a life with dignity and purpose. In Man’s Search for Meaning, Frankl reflects upon his experience and how he found hope in the most unlikely places.

Read on for key insights from Man’s Search for Meaning.

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8 Minute Read

Late Oxford philosopher and outspoken atheist Antony Flew shocked the world when he announced that he had reversed his views about God’s non-existence. In his autobiographical work There is a God, which he humorously describes as a last will and testament of sorts, Flew describes his upbringing, intellectual development, and some of the arguments that ultimately led him to embrace theism.

Read on for key insights from There is a God.

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8 Minute Read

C.S. Lewis described this book as a "preliminary study" on miracles. This description is fitting because he deals not with the question of whether miracles have actually happened, but with the prior question of whether they are possible. He begins by arguing against naturalism, a worldview that excludes the possibility of miraculous events. He then turns his attention to the probability of miracles, and, finally, to the nature and uniqueness of the Christian miracles. He does not try to prove Christianity. Rather, his aim is to remove impediments to clear thinking on the question of miracles that would prevent one from giving the Christian claims a fair hearing.

Read on for key insights from Miracles.

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11 Minute Read

Stephen Hawking is a world-renowned physicist, cosmologist and a professor at Cambridge University. He’s also an outspoken atheist. In his recent bestseller, The Grand Design, Hawking asserts that science has supplanted God as the explanation for the universe. This short book by John Lennox is primarily a rebuttal to that claim. A mathematician and scientist himself, Lennox contends that science is not at odds with religious belief. In fact, he argues that our increasing knowledge of the universe has made belief in God more rational, not less.

Read on for key insights from God and Stephen Hawking.

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8 Minute Read

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