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If you were a fly on the wall of the Trump White House, what would you see? Journalist Michael Wolff had that singular opportunity, and gives us a window into what it is like working for Trump both on the campaign trail and during his first year in office. In Fire and Fury, Wolff divulges scene after scene of dysfunction, power plays, and PR disasters, relying on both first-hand observations and scores of interviews with White House staffers.

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7 Minute Read

American liberals tend to see themselves as righteous champions of the oppressed, standing up against bullies who perpetuate inequality and injustice and all that’s bad in this world. According to syndicated columnist, Ben Shapiro, the grand irony is that liberals are the real bullies. In this book, Shapiro argues that the left, rather than actually helping victims, has successfully used victims—real and imagined—to gain moral high ground and bludgeon those with differing views into silence. In discussions about race, class, gender, the environment, and a slew of other topics, the left shuts down opposing views by vilifying the people who hold them.

Read on for key insights from Bullies.

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8 Minute Read

What happens when a scholar presents new evidence that threatens the foundations of a popular narrative? Ideally, those who hold to the established explanation examine the evidence presented, raise counterpoints if they have any and a discussion ensues. There are other times, however, when people come after the scholar instead of the idea. Psychologist Michael Bailey was one such scholar whose name and reputation got dragged through the mud after presenting a controversial thesis about sexual minorities. Scholar and activist Alice Dreger got caught in a crossfire when she showed the smear campaign to be motivated by ideology rather than facts. Galileo’s Middle Finger is a glimpse into Dreger’s world of activism and scholarship, the particulars of the Bailey smear, and how activists and academics handle controversies.

Read on for key insights from Galileo’s Middle Finger

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9 Minute Read

A few months after losing her second bid for the presidency and after some much needed rest, Hillary Rodham Clinton sat down to write a book detailing to herself and to her constituents what went wrong. She shoulders complete responsibility for her defeat. That said, there were many unexpected twists and turns that effected the election process. Clinton lays out in intricate detail how the combination of all these events led to her defeat. She also issues a warning about upcoming elections, anticipating that similar problems will recur in the future.

Read on for insights from What Happened.

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11 Minute Read

TIMES reporter Amanda Ripley was in the habit of sidestepping stories on education—until she saw a graph showing the United States’ educational standing compared to other nations. The United States was consistently average. By contrast, three countries—Finland, Poland, and South Korea—had come out of nowhere, and are now topping the charts. What were they doing that the United States was not? Has the United States failed to understand what does and does not make for a quality education? The Smartest Kids in the World is the story of what these countries teach us about educating effectively. Ripley’s conclusions will surprise some.

Read on for key insights from The Smartest Kids in the World.

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10 Minute Read

Not since the 1940s had a Foreign Policy piece elicited such strong reactions as Samuel Huntington’s piece titled “The Clash of Civilizations?” So furious was the pushback and frequent the misinterpretations of his thesis that Huntington turned his essay into a lengthy treatise, arguing that the strongest alliances and divides between peoples will not be between social classes, the rich and poor, or political ideologies, but between civilizations. Even decades after its publication, it is every bit as controversial and illuminating, and still considered one of the most significant essays on geopolitics.

Read on for key insights from The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order.

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9 Minute Read

Author and international health professor, Hans Rosling, calls Factfulness “his very last battle in [his] lifelong mission to fight devastating global ignorance.” After years of trying to convince the world that all development indicators point to vast improvements on a global scale, Rosling digs deeper to explore why people systematically have a negative view of where humanity is heading. He identifies a number of deeply human tendencies that predispose us to believe the worst. For every instinct that he names, he offers some rules of thumb for replacing this overdramatic worldview with a “factful” one.

Read on for key insights from Factfulness.   

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9 Minute Read

The question that the 1989 movie When Harry Met Sally poses is whether a man and a woman can be “just friends.” The question that people are asking in the wake of the stir that Caitlyn Jenner has catalyzed is whether a man can become a woman. If you’re looking to understand the transgender movement that is sweeping the United States, this book is a perfect place to start.

Read on for key insights from When Harry Became Sally.

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10 Minute Read

According to Gingrich, America has never seen a candidate like Donald Trump. Academia, the left, and the elite media have no idea how to deal with this outsider, and, as a result, they have let loose a torrent of criticism towards Trump, his policies, and his cabinet. Whatever one might think of Trump, there is no doubt that he has tapped into a part of America that felt it had been neglected and forgotten. Gingrich shares some perceptions gained through his personal interactions with Trump and familiarity with Trump’s life.

Read on for key insights from Understanding Trump.

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7 Minute Read

Economist Bryan Caplan boldly argues that benefits of education in its current form are tremendously overrated. Considering the money spent and the grueling hours that students are subjected to, very little prepares them for the actual workplace nor are there benefits to our broader society.

Read on for key insights from The Case Against Education. 

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7 Minute Read

What if humanity’s extinction doesn’t come about through climate change, a nuclear holocaust, or a virulent pathogen for which we have no cure? What if an Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) takeover is more than just a good sci-fi premise? Author and journalist James Barrat was a technophile and optimistic about AI’s potential to serve humanity—until he dug a little deeper and discovered a far more chilling (and likely) future.

Read on for key insights from Our Final Invention.

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8 Minute Read

Culture critic and writer Matt Walsh argues that conservatives and Christians have been too passive, and that they need to start standing up to the Left’s attempts at redefining objective truth to better suit liberal ideologies and agendas. If they succeed in refashioning fundamental ideas about marriage, gender, and life, the window of opportunity for reversing cultural trends will close soon.

Read on for key insights from The Unholy Trinity.

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8 Minute Read

Over the course of earth’s history, there have been five cataclysmic events that have radically altered—or ended—life for the planet’s inhabitants. Author and journalist Elizabeth Kolbert argues that humanity’s growing influence over climate and ecosystems is ushering in a sixth catastrophe that large swaths of plants and animals—including humans—may not survive.

Read on for key insights from The Sixth Extinction.

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8 Minute Read

Political science professor Robert Reich makes a case for America recentering its politics, economics, and culture on the concept of the common good. The past fifty years have been a story of win-at-all-costs politics and business strategies that is leaving the country’s social fabric threadbare. The Common Good is a both conciliatory and bracing exhortation to return to responsibility and trust-building.

Read on for key insights from The Common Good.

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9 Minute Read

The new century has been a dizzying spectacle so far, and it shows no signs of slowing down. Harari assesses humanity’s current predicament, discussing everything from AI and social media to evolving religions and updated forms of justice and government. This book raises questions and makes suggestions about how humanity might continue to find its way forward.

Read on for key insights from 21 Lessons for the 21st Century.

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10 Minute Read

On June 26, 2015, the Supreme Court determined in a 5-4 decision that the right to marriage extends to same-sex couples under the Equal Rights Protection Clause and the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. This Obergefell v. Hodges ruling was not an expansion but a fundamental change to the institution of marriage. A change of this magnitude will have significant impact on laws, policies, institutions, and culture for years to come. Researcher and political analyst Ryan T. Anderson gives his take on what that impact will likely be.

Read on for key insights from Truth Overruled.

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9 Minute Read

There are three Great Untruths that have begun to coalesce into a cult of “safetyism” in the United States. These untruths fly in the face of ancient wisdom and modern research, and have proven harmful to the individuals and groups who have imbibed them. Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt team up to illuminate these untruths and their deleterious effects, as well as suggest some remedies.

Read on for key insights from The Coddling of the American Mind.

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11 Minute Read