Most Popular Books

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In the popular sci-fi movie, The Matrix, the lead character, Neo, is informed that an artificial intelligence has subjugated the human race. To keep humanity blissfully unaware of its captivity, each person has been plugged into a life-like computer simulation. Upon his learning of this, Neo is given a choice between a blue pill and a red pill. If he takes the blue pill, he'll reenter the simulation none the wiser. If he takes the red pill, he'll escape the delusion and remain in the real world, awake and aware of the truth.

According to evolutionary psychologist Robert Wright, the circumstances and choice that Neo faced are also before us. Marshaling the latest in scientific and psychological research, he argues that science corroborates many central elements of Buddhist thought. Why Buddhism is True is his attempt to show how each of us has a warped understanding of reality and that Buddhist philosophy and meditation form the red pill we would be wise to take.

Read on for key insights from Why Buddhism is True.

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7 Minute Read

The question that the 1989 movie When Harry Met Sally poses is whether a man and a woman can be “just friends.” The question that people are asking in the wake of the stir that Caitlyn Jenner has catalyzed is whether a man can become a woman. If you’re looking to understand the transgender movement that is sweeping the United States, this book is a perfect place to start.

Read on for key insights from When Harry Became Sally.

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10 Minute Read

As Paul Kalanithi neared his graduation from Stanford Medical School, he knew he was physically ill. Subsequent testing confirmed that he had stage IV lung cancer. This book became his final project, an attempt to convey what dying means to a person who is still living. Paul chronicles those things that brought him a sense of significance throughout his life and especially in his last days. 

Read on for key insights from When Breath Becomes Air.

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13 Minute Read

A few months after losing her second bid for the presidency and after some much needed rest, Hillary Rodham Clinton sat down to write a book detailing to herself and to her constituents what went wrong. She shoulders complete responsibility for her defeat. That said, there were many unexpected twists and turns that effected the election process. Clinton lays out in intricate detail how the combination of all these events led to her defeat. She also issues a warning about upcoming elections, anticipating that similar problems will recur in the future.

Read on for insights from What Happened.

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11 Minute Read

On June 26, 2015, the Supreme Court determined in a 5-4 decision that the right to marriage extends to same-sex couples under the Equal Rights Protection Clause and the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. This Obergefell v. Hodges ruling was not an expansion but a fundamental change to the institution of marriage. A change of this magnitude will have significant impact on laws, policies, institutions, and culture for years to come. Researcher and political analyst Ryan T. Anderson gives his take on what that impact will likely be.

Read on for key insights from Truth Overruled.

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9 Minute Read

When we think of traumatic incidents, we think of near-fatal car accidents and natural disasters. But there is a demographic that is also unknowingly suffering from the effects of trauma: athletes. Placed in high-pressure, sometimes dangerous situations, athletes often endure physical and emotional traumas that wreck performance on a consistent basis. This Is Your Brain on Sports explores the issue of trauma and what can be done about it. It’s useful not just for athletes and coaches, but for anyone who is looking to understand how trauma works.


Read on for key insights from This Is Your Brain on Sports

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8 Minute Read

Some scientists have referred to the brain as the hardware of the soul. So what happens when the hardware is not functioning at an optimal level? If the hardware is compromised, then any software we try to add will have little to no effect. If we hope to experience joy in our lives, we must learn how the brain works. It turns out that the decisions we make can impact the brain, which means we have some measure of control over how much joy we experience in life. This Is Your Brain On Joy shows us how the brain functions, and gives suggestions for how our capacity for joy can be enhanced.  

Read on for key insights from This Is Your Brain On Joy.

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10 Minute Read

What kind of decision maker are you—an impulsive, shoot from the hip, let the chips fall where they may type? Or are you a more analytical, methodical, left-brained person? Truth be told, most of us exhibit traits from both camps. Rarely is anyone just one type or the other. Kahneman’s aim in this book isn’t to help us identify what kind of decision-maker we are, but to enlighten us about the factors which influence our decision processes, highlighting those factors of which we are often unaware.

Read on for key insights from Thinking, Fast and Slow.

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8 Minute Read

In a world full of randomness and chance, making smarter decisions in the face of uncertainty is a skill worth mastering. In Thinking in Bets, professional poker player Annie Duke becomes our guru to help us make better bets in life.

Read on for key insights from Thinking in Bets.

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8 Minute Read

Napoleon Hill was once a poor Appalachian boy. Orphaned at thirteen and poorly educated, he joined the newspaper business. After several years as a journalist, he had the good fortune of landing an interview with business tycoon Andrew Carnegie. Carnegie could see that young Hill had grasped the secrets of business success that Carnegie had been elucidating. Carnegie commissioned Hill to interview 500 successful individuals, learn their stories, and distill guiding principles of wealth acquisition that could be shared with the general public. Think and Grow Rich is a bestseller from 1937 that illuminates critical steps to success from Hill’s twenty-year project of researching success and interviewing tycoons and politicians like Teddy Roosevelt and Thomas Edison. What it all comes down to is the connection between outlook and making it rich. This book teaches you how to harness thought and turn it into wealth.

Read on for key insights from Think and Grow Rich.

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7 Minute Read