Most Popular Books

Sort by: Popularity | Release Date

As a political philosopher and German Jew during the rise of Nazism, Hannah Arendt had a lot to say about totalitarianism and the elements that give rise to such movements.

Read on for key insights from The Origins of Totalitarianism.

Add to Library

11 Minute Read

Across the plains of Osage, Oklahoma, small flowers begin to bloom in April. By May, however, larger plants spring up, overshadow, and choke out the smaller flowers that had blossomed first. The Osage Indians refer to May as the season of “the flower-killing moon.” This natural cycle is a fitting metaphor for the systematic murder of Osage Indians at the hands of greedy settlers wanting claim to Osage lands.

Read on for key insights from Killers of the Flower Moon.

Add to Library

12 Minute Read

C.S. Lewis examines some common assumptions about culture, science, and ethics that he believes are setting humanity on a path that will destroy both soul and species.

Read on for key insights from The Abolition of Man.

Add to Library

11 Minute Read

How do you enrich your inner life in a culture that cares far more about the externals? Columnist David Brooks marks out for us the forgotten road to character and introduces us to remarkable individuals from history who have walked it.

Read on for key insights from The Road to Character.

Add to Library

11 Minute Read

In his classic book The 5 Love Languages, psychologist and speaker Gary Chapman argues that dysfunction in marriages is largely rooted in the fact that we all speak different love languages, and people fail to learn and speak their partner’s. This leads to couples running on empty emotional tanks. Chapman explains the five love languages (words of affirmation, quality time, receiving gifts, acts of service, and physical touch), and then shows how the discovery of your spouse’s love language can lead to a more loving, lasting marriage.

Read on for key insights from The 5 Love Languages. 

Add to Library

10 Minute Read

How do we make sense of the disparity between the rich and poor? Why do some nations prosper and others fail? Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson argue that the common explanations of geography, culture, and ignorance are all inadequate. The answer to the question of inequality is found in institutions. Some nations have political and economic institutions conducive to growth while others do not. Why Nations Fail tells us why popular hypotheses don’t work and why institutions are the true difference makers.

Read on for key insights from Why Nations Fail.

Add to Library

8 Minute Read

As Paul Kalanithi neared his graduation from Stanford Medical School, he knew he was physically ill. Subsequent testing confirmed that he had stage IV lung cancer. This book became his final project, an attempt to convey what dying means to a person who is still living. Paul chronicles those things that brought him a sense of significance throughout his life and especially in his last days. 

Read on for key insights from When Breath Becomes Air.

Add to Library

13 Minute Read

Napoleon Hill was once a poor Appalachian boy. Orphaned at thirteen and poorly educated, he joined the newspaper business. After several years as a journalist, he had the good fortune of landing an interview with business tycoon Andrew Carnegie. Carnegie could see that young Hill had grasped the secrets of business success that Carnegie had been elucidating. Carnegie commissioned Hill to interview 500 successful individuals, learn their stories, and distill guiding principles of wealth acquisition that could be shared with the general public. Think and Grow Rich is a bestseller from 1937 that illuminates critical steps to success from Hill’s twenty-year project of researching success and interviewing tycoons and politicians like Teddy Roosevelt and Thomas Edison. What it all comes down to is the connection between outlook and making it rich. This book teaches you how to harness thought and turn it into wealth.

Read on for key insights from Think and Grow Rich.

Add to Library

7 Minute Read

In The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck, Mark Manson takes on the prevailing cultural beliefs about the good life. He identifies the sources and assumptions of a toxic positivity that leads to paralyzing, unrealistic expectations and a generation of people who feel worthless, discontented, and depressed. His counterintuitive approach is to stop trying so hard, and figure out what is actually worth caring about and what is not. This book provides tools for reframing the way we see the world, our problems, our values, and ourselves.

Read on for key insights from The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck. 

Add to Library

10 Minute Read

Since its publication in 1989, Covey’s The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People has sold more than 25 million copies worldwide. Covey’s approach differs from the myriad quick-fix solutions that promise outward change, but neglect to evaluate the character and habits of the person. This book defines a habit as the internalization of principles such as empathy, cooperation, and growth. As Covey shows us, to achieve your goals, you must build your character on a principle-centered foundation.

Read on for key insights from The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.

Add to Library

9 Minute Read