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We live in what some have called the Age of Melancholia. There is a mushrooming depression epidemic that must be dealt with—but how? Psychologist Martin Seligman, famous for his research on learned helplessness, argues that a person’s explanation for moments of failure and misfortune has the power to either encourage pessimism and depression or preempt the downward spiral. Learned Optimism holds out hope that pessimism and depression are not personal traits that people are stuck with. A new set of cognitive skills can help people bounce back from misfortune and failure instead of habitually falling to pieces.

Read on for key insights from Learned Optimism.

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9 Minute Read

At age 23, clinical psychologist Amy Morin lost her mother to a brain aneurysm. On the three-year anniversary of her mother’s death, Morin lost her husband. Not long after remarrying, her father-in-law was diagnosed with a terminal cancer. Refusing to be shattered by yet another death, she sat down to write a list of mental pits that she would need to avoid as she anticipated yet another loss.

Read on for key insights from 13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do.

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C.S. Lewis described this book as a "preliminary study" on miracles. This description is fitting because he deals not with the question of whether miracles have actually happened, but with the prior question of whether they are possible. He begins by arguing against naturalism, a worldview that excludes the possibility of miraculous events. He then turns his attention to the probability of miracles, and, finally, to the nature and uniqueness of the Christian miracles. He does not try to prove Christianity. Rather, his aim is to remove impediments to clear thinking on the question of miracles that would prevent one from giving the Christian claims a fair hearing.

Read on for key insights from Miracles.

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The new century has been a dizzying spectacle so far, and it shows no signs of slowing down. Harari assesses humanity’s current predicament, discussing everything from AI and social media to evolving religions and updated forms of justice and government. This book raises questions and makes suggestions about how humanity might continue to find its way forward.

Read on for key insights from 21 Lessons for the 21st Century.

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In the 1991 comedy City Slickers, there’s a memorable exchange between the film’s protagonists, in which the older, sage figure tells the younger character, “Do you know what the secret of life is? One thing. Just one thing. You stick to that, and everything else don’t mean sh*t…. That’s what you’ve got to figure out.” Gary Keller (co-founder of the world’s most successful real estate company, Keller Williams Realty) teams up with his editor, Jay Papasan, to convince the world that this is the soundest advice out there, that to find and pursue that One Thing is the key to a life that is simpler, less stressful and more meaningful.

 Read on for key insights from The One Thing.

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This classic by Dale Carnegie has been in print for over 80 years. The book is for anyone who wants to learn how to work effectively with people, to handle conflicts more gracefully, to criticize without offending, and to win others to alternative ways of thinking. Carnegie outlines numerous principles, each full of anecdotes and the writings of famous intellectuals and politicians, as well as his own personal experiences. The principles give the reader insights into what makes humans tick and makes them happy. Carnegie maintains that following these principles will pave the way for more meaningful friendships, wider influence, and greater success in life. 

Read on for key insights from How to Win Friends and Influence People.

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Some scientists have referred to the brain as the hardware of the soul. So what happens when the hardware is not functioning at an optimal level? If the hardware is compromised, then any software we try to add will have little to no effect. If we hope to experience joy in our lives, we must learn how the brain works. It turns out that the decisions we make can impact the brain, which means we have some measure of control over how much joy we experience in life. This Is Your Brain On Joy shows us how the brain functions, and gives suggestions for how our capacity for joy can be enhanced.  

Read on for key insights from This Is Your Brain On Joy.

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Late Oxford philosopher and outspoken atheist Antony Flew shocked the world when he announced that he had reversed his views about God’s non-existence. In his autobiographical work There is a God, which he humorously describes as a last will and testament of sorts, Flew describes his upbringing, intellectual development, and some of the arguments that ultimately led him to embrace theism.

Read on for key insights from There is a God.

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8 Minute Read

Culture critic and writer Matt Walsh argues that conservatives and Christians have been too passive, and that they need to start standing up to the Left’s attempts at redefining objective truth to better suit liberal ideologies and agendas. If they succeed in refashioning fundamental ideas about marriage, gender, and life, the window of opportunity for reversing cultural trends will close soon.

Read on for key insights from The Unholy Trinity.

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In a world that seems fast-paced, we have lost the art of serenity, of being still. We hunt the next high, we chase the next craze, accrue more things, but where does this get us? Paradoxically, for all our chasing, we miss out on so much! In The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down, Sunim offers reflections on life, love, relationships, and spirituality, illuminating aspects of the human condition that we are prone to forget.

Read on for key insights from The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down.

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9 Minute Read